Category Archives: Book Prize

The 2018 Wainwright Golden Beer Book Prize – Shortlist Announcement

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The 2018 Wainwright Golden Beer Book Prize – Shortlist Announcement.

Thursday 5th July saw the announcement of the much anticipated Wainwright Golden Beer Book Prize Shortlist. This year there are seven books that make the shortlist and what a shortlist. Later that day at there was a party to celebrate the shortlist announcement which was held at Waterstones Piccadilly were all the authors of the books were present as well as some of the judges and invited guests.

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Chair of Judges: Julia Bradbury

Chair of judges Julia Bradbury introduced each of the authors and their books and gave an insight to this year’s book prize and how difficult it has become to judge as the standard of nature writing has increased year on year since the prize was first launched. It is pleasing that this year for the first time we have a children’s book in The Lost Words by Robert Macfarlane and Jackie Morris.

The judges for this year’s prize are for the second year will be chaired by Julia Bradbury, and her fellow judges are: TV presenter Megan Hine; Waterstones non-fiction buyer Bea Carvalho; National Trust publisher Katie Bond and ex-chairman of the campaign to protect rural England, Peter Waine.

The winner of the Wainwright Book Prize again this year be announced the National Trust Arena at BBC Countryfile Live at Blenheim Palace, on 2 August. The winner will receive a cheque to the value of £5,000.

This is a book prize that is very close to my heart as my passion is nature and the great outdoors and to share this book prize that has the name of one of my boyhood heroes the great man himself Alfred Wainwright a lover of the fells of the Lake District and also a  great writer.

The 2018 Wainwright Golden Beer Book Prize Shortlist:

Alys Fowler

Hidden Nature by Alys Fowler (Hodder & Stoughton)

Written by award winning Guardian writer, Alys Fowler explore the canals and waterways of Birmingham via a Kyak. A book of real beauty where she explores and finds nature in places many would not expect. But this is now just a nature book, it is a personal journey of losing and finding and opening up. Nature as well as a personal journey.

240 Pages

 

John Grindrod

Outskirts by John Grindrod (Sceptre)

A social history of Britain’s green belt landscape. Conservationists and developers as well as politicians have come into conflict since the post wat years as more and more land is sought after. Hidden in the landscape that John explores are nuclear bunkers, landfill sites and on his journey meets those who fight for the protection of green belt land and those who seek to exploit it. This is a fascinating insight into today’s Britain and its social history.

368 Pages

John Lister-Kaye

The Dun Cow Rib by John Lister-Kaye (Canongate)

I have long been a fan of John Lister-Kayes writing since Song of the Rolling Earth was published in 2003. With his latest book that has made the longlist this is his memoir of growing up and finding that the natural world was about to become his life. From finding nature to founding the Aigas Field Centre in the Highlands, this is John’s memoir to this countries natural landscape and heritage.

368 Pages

Neil Ansell

The Last Wilderness by Neil Ansell – Tinder Press

Alone with nature in some of the remote parts of Britain. This is Neil’s personal account of time in solitude. A time spent as one with the natural world at a time when he was losing his hearing the sound and birdsong slowly are lost to him. A captivating memoir.

320 Pages.

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The Salt Path by Raynor Winn (Michael Joseph)

This is the true story of a couple who lost everything just days after learning that her husband was terminally ill. Everything they have worked so hard for is gone. With little time left they set about walking the entire 630 miles of the SW Costal Path. Coming to terms with what they have lost and what is to come, this is a deeply honest and life-affirming account of a couple and a journey. Nature has the power to cure and with every moment on their walk around the coastline they find beauty in the land, sea and sky.

288 Pages.

Adam Nicholson

The Seabird’s Cry by Adam Nicolson (William Collins, Harper Collins)

There are ten chapters and each one is dedicated to ten seabirds. Charting their ocean travels and is set in the Scottish Shiant Isles a group of Hebridean islands in the Minch. With artwork by Kate Boxer this is look at these wonderful seabirds, with numbers now crashing this is timely and well researched book from a writer that has spent many years studying these wonderful seabirds. Were once the numbers where in many thousands they are now at a shocking level that one day soon could be lost forever and we will be left recalling reading about them in books. And that day could be very close.

416 Pages.

The Lost Words

The Lost Words by Robert Macfarlane and Jackie Morris (Hamish Hamilton)

Overtime there have been words from the natural world that have been lost to children. Robert Macfarlane writes the poems that tells of those lost words that meant so much to those of us who grew to learn them and Jackie Morris provides the stunning artwork. An enchanting book that has now gone into many schools around the country. A wonderful book that has already won many accolades.

128 Pages.

The Wainwright Book Prize is named after the Lakelands much loved Alfred Wainwright, and is supported by White Lion Publishing (publisher of the world famous Wainwright Guides), Wainwright Golden Beer, the Wainwright Estate and in Partnership with The National Trust. The winner receives a cheque for £5,000.

For more information, and details of the shortlist  can be found on their website with a photo gallery from the shortlist party just visit:  The Wainwright Book Prize and you can follow on Twitter via: Wainwright Prize

The Wainwright Book Prize is named after the Lakelands much loved Alfred Wainwright, and is supported by White Lion Publishing (publisher of the world famous Wainwright Guides), Wainwright Golden Beer, the Wainwright Estate and in Partnership with The National Trust. The winner receives a cheque for £5,000.

For more information, visit The Wainwright Book Prize and you can follow on Twitter via: Wainwright Prize 

Look out for my podcast coming soon were I will be discussing the Wainwright Book Prize shortlist and looking forward to the winner being announced on August 2nd at BBC Countryfile Live.

#WainwrightPrize18   #LetTheOutDoorsIn   #FindYourMountain

PRIZE DRAW:

WP Shortlist 2018

I am delighted to announce that I am running a prize draw to win a complete set of books (Seven) that make up the shortlist. If you are a lover of nature and the outdoors these are a set of books that will make your summer. A collection of books that just outstanding it the quality of writing. To stand a chance of winning the set please visit my Twitter page: The Last Word 1962 All you have to do is follow and RT the Wainwright Prize Draw Shortlist. Please NoteThe Draw will close at 7pm Friday 13th July. This is a UK only prize draw. Entrants after this time will not be included. GOOD LUCK! The prize will be issued by Mark Hutchinson Management.

My thanks to Laura Creyke and the team at Mark Hutchinson Management for the amazing work and for allowing me to run the Shortlist Prize Draw.

 

 

 

 

 

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10th Swansea University International Dylan Thomas Prize – 2018 Shortlist

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DEBUTS SHINE IN FEMALE-LED SHORTLIST FOR

WORLD’S BIGGEST PRIZE FOR YOUNG WRITERS

 10th Swansea University International Dylan Thomas Prize shortlist announced

10th Swansea University International Dylan Thomas Prize shortlist announced

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Top row L-R: , Emily Ruskovich, Gabriel Tallent, Gwendoline Riley

Bottom L-R: Kayo Chingonyi, Sally Rooney, Carmen Maria Machado

NOVELS

GWENDOLINE RILEY (UK)

SALLY ROONEY (IRELAND)

EMILY RUSKOVICH (USA)

GABRIEL TALLENT (USA)

 

SHORT STORIES

CARMEN MARIA MACHADO (USA)

 

POETRY

KAYO CHINGONYI (ZAMBIA)

 

 Four debut authors make up the female dominant shortlist of six for the 10th edition of the Swansea University International Dylan Thomas Prize which celebrates the brightest young writers in the world. Worth £30,000, it is the world’s largest literary prize for young writers aged 39 or under, open to writers from all nations, writing in English.
2017 sparked this century’s biggest gender equality movement, and this year’s female-led international shortlist brings to the fore crucial themes of sexual violence, toxic relationships, masculinity and racial divisions, that are relevant across the world, not just the UK. Just as Dylan Thomas’ universal poetry captured the grief and loss of innocence in post-war Britain, the prize showcases the breadth and diversity of literature that captures the political zeitgeist of today.

Featured on the shortlist this year are:

  • Zambian-born poet Kayo Chingonyi (31) for his debut collection of poetry Kumakanda, which explores the rites of passage boys go through to become men, the intersection of masculinity and race and what it means to be British and not British, all at once.

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  • Cuban-American short-story writer Carmen Maria Machado’s (31) debut short story collection Her Body & Other Parties explores the eroticism, violence and emotion of the female experience through a potent mix of science fiction, ghost stories and fairytales.

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  • Six-time British novelist Gwendoline Riley (39) has been shortlisted for First Love, a compelling tale of toxic love and poisonous partnerships which has been shortlisted for the Bailey’s Women’s Prize for Fiction and the Goldsmiths Prize.

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  • Irish debut novelist and Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year Sally Rooney (27) has been called the “Salinger for the Snapchat generation” and her runaway success Conversations with Friends.

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  • Debut American novelist Emily Ruskovich (31) is shortlisted for her thriller hit Idaho, which tells the story of a mother suddenly killing her six-year-old daughter.

 

  • American thriller author Gabriel Tallent (30) has been shortlisted for his debut novel My Absolute Darling, called “the year’s must-read novel” by The Times and ‘a masterpiece’ by Stephen King.

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2018 will be the 10th edition of The Swansea University International Dylan Thomas Prize, and will commemorate 65 years since the death of Wales’ most lauded writer Dylan Thomas. The winner will be announced on 10th May.

 

Awarded for the best published literary work in the English language, written by an author aged 39 or under, the prize celebrates the international world of fiction in all its forms including poetry, novels, short stories and drama. The prize is named after the Swansea-born writer Dylan Thomas who died at just 39 years old as one of the most important writers of the 20th century. Dylan captured the attention of the literary world at just 20 years old with his poem Light Breaks Where No Sun Shines, and had already reached international acclaim by the time his most famous work Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night was published. The prize invokes his memory to support the best young writers of today and nurture the talents of tomorrow.

 

In 2017, Australian writer Fiona McFarlane won The Swansea University International Dylan Thomas Prize for her highly-acclaimed collection of short stores, The High Places.

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Professor Dai Smith CBE of Swansea University, chair of the judges said: “The shortlist of the 2018 Swansea University International Dylan Thomas Prize is an amazing showcase of young writing talent from across the globe. There are two startling and searing novels from contemporary America; two other novels which engage in a forensic examination of love and loathing, from England  and Ireland; an inventively original collection of short stories from the USA and a challenging, poised work of poetry which takes us to the core of a divided Britain. The judges will have a difficult job over the next two months to find a winner from what is already a list of winners.”

 

Chaired by Professor Dai Smith CBE, Emeritus Raymond Williams Research Chair in the Cultural History of Wales at Swansea University, and historian and writer on Welsh arts and culture, this year’s judging panel also features: Founder and Director of the Jaipur Literature Festival, Namita Gokhale; winner of the inaugural International Dylan Thomas Prize novelist and playwright, Rachel Trezise; poet, translator, and scholar, Professor Kurt Heinzelman; and author and Founder of London Short Story Festival, Paul McVeigh.

 

The winner will be announced on Thursday 10th May at an award ceremony at Swansea University’s Great Hall, in the run up to International Dylan Thomas Day on 14th May commemorating 65 years since Dylan Thomas’ death. The British Library will be hosting a special public event with all the shortlisted author on Tuesday 8th May.

 

The shortlisted authors will also participate in the DylanED programme, an initiative set up by Swansea University in conjunction with the prize to engage young people with international literature and Wales’ rich cultural history. The shortlist is directly involved in the programme that runs all year round, and authors have previously done workshops with local college students, given readings and talks at local schools, and given masterclasses at the University. Since 2016 Welsh students are invited to review books from the shortlist for the DylanED Book Review Competition and will present their winning reviews at a special winner’s ceremony in front of the shortlisted authors.

 

 

 

 

@dylanthomasprize

#IDTP18

@midaspr

My thanks to Rachel Kennedy from Midas Public Relations for that honour of bringingyou the 2018 10th Swansea University International Dylan Thomas Prize Shortlist.

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