Category Archives: Fiction

Call Me Star Girl by Louise Beech

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Call Me Star Girl by Louise Beech

Pregnant Victoria Valbon was brutally murdered in an alley three weeks ago – and her killer hasn’t been caught.

Tonight is Stella McKeever’s final radio show. The theme is secrets. You tell her yours, and she’ll share some of hers.

Stella might tell you about Tom, a boyfriend who likes to play games, about the mother who abandoned her, now back after fourteen years. She might tell you about the perfume bottle with the star-shaped stopper, or about her father …

What Stella really wants to know is more about the mysterious man calling the station … who says he knows who killed Victoria, and has proof.

Tonight is the night for secrets, and Stella wants to know everything…

With echoes of the Play Misty for Me, Call Me Star Girl is a taut, emotive and all-consuming psychological thriller that plays on our deepest fears, providing a stark reminder that stirring up dark secrets from the past can be deadly…

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I have been a huge fan of Louise Beech since her debut novel How to be Brave (Orenda Books) was released back in 2015. Just look how far this amazing writing journey has taken Louise to-date. Now comes her latest release Call Me Star Girl (Orenda Books) which hit the bookshops on 18th April. Now I read this back in February and have had to wait ever so patiently to post my review.

To put it simply Louise Beech has blown me away. It can be difficult when a writer changes genre style but Louise has done this effortlessly. Now a psychological thriller writer and it is just sensational. Anyone who has seen the Hollywood film Play Misty for Me starring Clint Eastwood will love this novel.

Stella McKeever is a radio show host and it is her last show and she decides she wants to end with something different. Stella asks her listeners to call in with their secrets, and in return Stella would share some of hers. Dangerous territory for a radio host to enter as you just don’t know how far it could go.

Then a local girl is found dead and it is clear this is murder and there has been a witness and this witness calls the studio to say they saw the murder. The beauty of this tight and pulse racing thriller is that there are not many characters in the storyline so you get to concentrate on the plot.

Stella has her own secrets and these include the relationship with her boyfriend Tom. Then there is her mother and the broken relationship between them both.

There is something about creating a storyline around a radio station at night it is dark and quiet. Just you and your listeners and you set the tone and you can hold them in the palm of your hand. There are many twists and turns in the plot that you just do not know where it is likely to turn next.

The tension builds so much that you could cut with a studio microphone, it is atmospheric and compelling. You might even say disturbing. But either way it is nothing short of brilliant. Louise Beech’s fifth novel is by far her very best and this is why I love Louise Beech’s writing. HIGHY RECOMMENDED

@LouiseWriter  @OrendaBooks

#CallMeStarGirl

300 Pages.

Thank you to Karen Sullivan (Orenda Books and Anne Cater for the review copy of Call Me Star Girl by Louise Beech

Call Me Star Girl by Louise Beech was published by Orenda Books and was published on 18th April 2019 and is available through Waterstones, Amazon and through your local independent bookshop.

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The Swansea University International Dylan Thomas Prize Shortlist 2019

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On Tuesday 2nd April the shortlist for The 2019 Swansea University International Dylan Thomas Prize was announced. Always one of the most anticipated of literary prizes. The winner will be announced on Thursday 16th May. There will be a special event being held at the British Library on 15th May when all the shortlisted authors will be present. I am really excited at this year’s longlist and already looking forward the British Library event as I will be attending this year.

You can follow the prize via Twitter: @dylanthomprize #IDTP19

This year’s shortlist of 6 books comprises five novels, one short story collection.

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The Shortlisted authors:

The 6 shortlisted books comprise 5 novels and 1 collection of short stories including:

  • American-Ghanaian writer Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah (27) for his debut short story collection Friday Black (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (US) and Riverrun (UK)) which explores what it’s like to grow up as a black male in America, and whose powerful style of writing has been likened to George Saunders.
  • Debut novelist Zoe Gilbert (39) for Folk (Bloomsbury Publishing) which was developed from her fascination in ancient folklore and the resurgence of nature writing. She has previously won the Costa Short Story Award in 2014.
  • British-Sri-Lankan debut novelist, Guy Gunaratne (34) for In Our Mad and Furious City (Tinder Press, Headline), longlisted for The Man Booker Prize and shortlisted for The Goldsmiths Prize, The Gordon Burn Prize as well as the Writers Guild Awards.
  • Third time novelist, Louisa Hall (36) with her latest book Trinity (Ecco) which tackles the complex life of the Father of the Atomic Bomb, J. Robert Oppenheimer through seven fictional characters.
  • For the second time Sarah Perry (39) has been shortlisted for the Prize this time for Melmoth (Serpent’s Tail), one of The Observer’s Best Fiction Books of the Year 2018, and a masterpiece of moral complexity, asking us profound questions about mercy, redemption, and how to make the best of our conflicted world.
  • Zimbabwean debut novelist Novuyo Rosa Tshuma (30) with her wildly inventive and darkly humorous novel House of Stone (Atlantic Books) which reveals the mad and glorious death of colonial Rhodesia and the bloody birth of modern Zimbabwe.

The winner will be announced on Thursday 16th May at Swansea University’s Great Hall, just after International Dylan Thomas Day on 14th May.

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Author Bios:

Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah is from Spring Valley, New York. He graduated from SUNY Albany and went on to receive his MFA from Syracuse University. He was the ’16-’17 Olive B. O’Connor fellow in fiction at Colgate University. His work has appeared in numerous publications, including Guernica, Compose: A Journal of Simply Good Writing, Printer’s Row, Gravel, and The Breakwater Review, where he was selected by ZZ Packer as the winner of the 2nd Annual Breakwater Review Fiction Contest. Friday Black is his first book.

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Zoe Gilbert is the winner of the Costa Short Story Award 2014. Her work has appeared on BBC Radio 4, and in anthologies and journals in the UK and internationally. She has taken part in writing projects in China and South Korea for the British Council, and she is completing a PhD on folk tales in contemporary fiction. The co-founder of London Lit Lab, which provides writing courses and mentoring for writers, she lives on the coast in Kent.

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Guy Gunaratne lives between London, UK and Malmö, Sweden. His first novel In Our Mad and Furious City was longlisted for The Man Booker Prize and shortlisted for The Goldsmiths Prize, The Gordon Burn Prize as well as the Writers Guild Awards. He has worked as a journalist and documentary filmmaker covering human rights stories around the world.

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Louisa Hall grew up in Philadelphia. She is the author of the novels Speak and The Carriage House, and her poems have been published in The New Republic, Southwest Review, and other journals. She is a professor at the University of Iowa, and the Western Writer in Residence at Montana State University. Trinity is her third novel.

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Sarah Perry was born in Essex in 1979. She has been the writer in residence at Gladstone’s Library and the UNESCO World City of Literature Writer in Residence in Prague. After Me Comes the Flood, her first novel, was longlisted for the Guardian First Book Award and the Folio Prize and won the East Anglian Book of the Year Award in 2014. Her latest novel, The Essex Serpent, was a number one bestseller in hardback, Waterstones Book of the Year 2016, the British Book Awards Book of the Year 2017, was shortlisted for the Costa Novel Award and Dylan Thomas Award, and longlisted for the Bailey’s Women’s Prize for Fiction 2017. Her work has been translated into twenty languages. She lives in Norwich.

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Novuyo Rosa Tshuma grew up in Zimbabwe and has lived in South Africa and the USA. She is a graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop. Her short fiction has been featured in numerous anthologies, and she was awarded the 2014 Herman Charles Bosman Prize for the best literary work in English

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Meet the Judges

Professor Kurt Heinzelman is a poet, translator, and scholar. His most recent book of poems is Whatever You May Say and he has translated Demarcations, a collection of poems by Jean Follain. He has been the Executive Curator at the Harry Ransom Centre and the Director of Education at the Blanton Museum of Art. A Professor of English at the University of Texas-Austin specializing in Poetry and Poetics and a teacher in the Michener Centre for Writers, he is also the former Editor-in-Chief of Texas Studies in Literature and Language (TSLL), and the co-founder and long-time Advisory Editor of Bat City Review. [photo credit University of Texas at Austin/ Christina S. Murrey]

Professor Dai Smith CBE is a distinguished historian and writer on Welsh arts and culture. As a Broadcaster he has won numerous awards for arts and historical documentaries and from 1992 to 2000 was Head of Programmes at BBC Wales. He was Pro-Vice Chancellor of the University of Glamorgan from 2001 until 2005 and is currently the Emeritus Raymond Williams Research Chair in the Cultural History of Wales at Swansea University. He was Chair of the Arts Council of Wales from 2006 until 2016 and is Series Editor of the Welsh Assembly Government’s Library of Wales for classic works. In 2013, he published a novel Dream On and in 2014 edited definitive anthologies of Welsh short stories, Story I & II, for the Library of Wales. His latest fiction, the novella What I Know I Cannot Say, and the linked short stories All That Lies Beneath, was published by Parthian Books in 2017. Professor Smith is Chair of the Judging Panel.

Di Speirs is the Books Editor for BBC Radio, overseeing all London Readings, ‘Open Book’ and ‘Book club’ on BBC Radio 4 and ‘World Book Club’ on the BBC World Service. She has produced innumerable editions of ‘Book at Bedtime’ over two decades and produced the first ever ‘Book of the Week’ in 1998. Instrumental in the BBC National Short Story Award since its inception, and its regular judge, she has also chaired the Orange Award for New Writers in 2010, judged the Wellcome Prize in 2017 and twice been a nominator for the Rolex Mentor and Protégé Arts Initiative (Literature). She is a member of the Charleston Small Wonder Lifetime’s Excellence in Short Fiction Award panel.

Kit de Waal was born in Birmingham to an Irish mother and Caribbean father. She worked for fifteen years in criminal and family law, for Social Services and the Crown Prosecution Service. She is a founding member of Leather Lane Writers and Oxford Narrative Group and has won numerous awards for her short stories and flash fiction. My Name is Leon, her debut novel won the Kerry Group Irish Novel of the Year 2017 and was shortlisted for numerous other awards including the Costa First Book Award and the Desmond Elliott Prize. The Trick to Time, her second novel, was published in 2018 and was longlisted for the Women’s Prize for Fiction.

My thanks to the team at Midas PR.

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The Ghost Tree by Barbara Erskine

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The Ghost Tree by Barbara Erskine

Released in paperback on 7th March is the latest best-seller by Barbara Erskine. The Ghost Tree (Harper Collins). The main character Ruth Dunbar has returned to Edinburgh after the death of her father. Now she is faced with sifting through all his belongings.

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Ruth is having a tough time after the break-up of her marriage and also losing her career. The death of her father has come as a latest blow. Sifting through her father’s she now comes across a cupboard full of possessions belonging to her mother among them are letters and documents and also diaries kept by her mother’s ancestor Thomas Erskine. Thomas really lived a life but as she reads she begins to feel she is not alone in this isolated room at the top of the house.

As the name of the book suggests this is also a ghost story. But it is not just the ghost of Thomas Erskine that Ruth can feel, as she discovers more about Thomas’s past she also realises that he had his enemies and now she feels the presence of not only Thomas but also his enemy.

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Ruth now must count on her friends who have experience in dealing with the paranormal. This is not really a scary ghost story but you find this novel dealing with aspects of trying to rid the house of the ghostly existence.

The story moves between the past and the present and this historical part of the novel I enjoyed more especially as Barbara Erskine brought into the novel her great-great-great-great-great grandfather Thomas Erskine who she heard so much about through her own family.

It is not only the past that contains enemies but also the present for Ruth, one such person is Timothy one man that really is not at all pleasant and is seriously questioning Ruth’s inheritance.

If you are a fan of Barbara Erskine then this really is for you.

592 Pages.

Thank you to Charlotte Walker from LoveReading for the review copy of The Ghost Tree by Barbara Erskine.

The Ghost Tree by Barbara Erskine was published by Harper Collins and was published on 7th March 2019 in Paperback and is available through Waterstones, Amazon and through your local independent bookshop.

The Ghost Tree – Blog Tour 

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Number One Chinese Restaurant by Lillian Li

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Number One Chinese Restaurant by Lillian Li

 

This book really intrigued me before I started reading Number One Chinese Restaurant the debut by Lillian Li. (One, Imprint of Pushkin Press). I need not have worried. An incredible novel set in a Chinese restaurant and the character’s that both run and work there. We have all eaten in restaurants but how many take time just to stop and think about what really goes on behind the scenes.

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This really is the ultimate character driven novel as there are many and you get to meet them. The trials and tribulations of the members of staff at the Beijing Duck House, Rockville, Maryland. They have been dishing up Chinese food now for many decades but when you have many people working closely together even if they are as close as a family, there are the usual tensions that are bubbling away just under the surface.

One aspect of this fabulous novel that I really enjoyed was each of the characters you get to meet in each of the chapters. So many interesting threads through the book that keeps you wanting to know more about the people who work there many as immigrants and their offspring. This really is a very large family drama being played out page by page.

There is Jimmy whose passion is to break away and set up his own restaurant but his relationship with Johnny is complex and many then there is Nan who is the Manager of the Duck House Restaurant and that of Ah-Jack who seems to have been there forever but he is formidable character.

Even in the best of family’s trouble can simmer and bubble to the surface and this does come through in Li’s writing and it is Nan who seems to have to deal with the many complex characters who work there. We also get to meet one of the original owners Feng Fei Wang who is full of zeal, she is wise but can stand up for herself if needs be.

It is a heart-warming story interjected with humour of characters that are workers, friends, family and more. This really is a compelling novel I found hard to leave alone for too long. Lillian Li’s prose is delicious and one I devoured like my favourite Chinese meal. Highly Recommended .

LONGLISTED FOR THE 2019 WOMEN’S PRIZE FOR FICTION

336 Pages.

Thank you to Tabitha Pelly at Pushkin Press for the review copy of Number One Chinese Restaurant by Lillian Li.

Number One Chinese Restaurant by Lillian Li was published by One an imprint of Pushkin Press and was published on 7th Febraury 2019 and is available through Waterstones, Amazon and through your local independent bookshop.

Where Reasons End by Yiyun Li

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Where Reasons End by Yiyun Li

There are many conversations we have in life and some that are difficult but at the same time there are conversations that none of us want to have. In Where Reasons End by Yiyun Li (Hamish Hamilton) is a deeply moving account of a mother having a conversation with her son who took his own life.

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It is understandable that some may find this an uncomfortable book to pick up and read, but what I would say is do not be put off, this is a remarkable story that is being told. The narrator is a Chinese – American writer and it was her son Nikolai who was full of life took his own life, leaving his mother to try and understand why.

Soon after her son’s death a conversation begins between them and it is an extended conversation and sometimes Nikolai would seem to be a little harsh on his mother. We start to learn about Nikolai and what he really enjoyed in life but also the pain that was clearly there. As I was reading I guess I fell into a trap expecting to learn why Nikolai took his own life but it is his mother who talks of life after her son is gone. There are many questions in life and sometimes no matter how hard we try answers are never found.

I have been very lucky to have read many great books so far this year but there is something here that is just remarkable, there is no doubt it is an incredibly sad novel to read but Where Reasons End is nothing short of a masterpiece of a novel. As a writer Yiyun Li is at the top of her game as a writer and one everyone who loves writers should be shouting her name from every rooftop.

Of course this is a book that pour out grief and unspeakable pain and it should be, but this conversation that takes place is in a place that none of us want ever to visit.

There is real sadness about Where Reasons End when you understand Yiyun Li’s own life. Do writers sometimes write to escape? I don’t fully know the answer to that question but I would seriously recommend reading Where Reasons End.

192 Pages.

Thank you to Hamish Hamilton for the review copy of Where Reasons End by Yiyun Li.

Where Reasons End by Yiyun Li was published by Hamish Hamilton and was published on 7th February 2018 and is available through Waterstones, Amazon and through your local independent bookshop.

The Courier by Kjell Ola Dahl

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The Courier by Kjell Ola Dahl

(Translated by Don Bartlett)

I have loved thrillers and espionage novels for many years but along comes The Courier by Kjell Ola Dahl (Orenda Books) and weaves them both together and set in the darkest part of Europe’s history. It set in Oslo in 1942 and Esther just manages to escape being seized by the dreaded Gestapo.

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Ester manages to escape to Sweden, but she will never see her family again as they are arrested and sent to Auschwitz. It is while in Sweden she meets the mysterious and yet resistance hero Gerard Falkum. Gerard has fled the Gestapo and has his own story to tell.

There are stories about Falkum murdering his wife Åse who just happened to be Ester’s close friend while they were at school. Are these stories true and why would Falkum kill his wife? But then he dies in a fire. Ester wants answers to how and why her best friend died. There is immense tension all through the story as Ester plays a deadly game that could end in her being arrested by the Nazis and sent to one of the death camps. But Ester want and seeks answers.

The story then flits forward twenty-five years and the mysterious Falkum appears to have come back from the dead and shows up in Oslo. Where has he been all these years. There is danger ahead for Ester and she must use all her courage to keep one step ahead and stay alive. This is a superbly character driven storyline set in a time when many did brave things to defeat the Nazi’s. A tense and compelling plot that has many twists. The movement between different timelines is easy to follow as they are marked at the start of every chapter.

For Ester she seeks answers about her friend and also answers to what happened to her own family. There is incredible emotion at this point as I have read many books on the Holocaust.

It is not hard to see why Kjell Ola Dahl is so highly respected. The Courier is exceptional and is one of the best books I have read so far this year and will take some beating. Six out of Five stars. A MUST READ!

276 Pages.

Thank you to Karen Sullivan (Orenda Books) for the review copy of The Courier by Kjell Ola Dahl.

The Courier by Kjell Ola Dahl published by Orenda Books and will be published on 21st March 2018 and is available to pre-order through Waterstones, Amazon and through your local independent bookshop.

The Flower Girls by Alice Clark-Platts

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The Flower Girls – Alice Clark-Platts

Another top notch thriller that hit the bookstands in January was The Flower Girls by Alice Clark-Platts and one that I thoroughly enjoyed reading. Pulsating and compelling. A thumping good page turner. A story of a child murderer another given a new identity and what happens when that identity is revealed.

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1997 and sisters Laurel and Rosie are playing in the park and invite another girl (Kirstie) to play with them. Kirstie does not return and is found murdered and horribly tortured. Ten-year-old Laurel is found guilty of Kirstie’s murder. Rosie who is only six does not stand trial as she is too young. Instead her and her new family are given new identities and moved away to a new town.

Bring the story to current day and Primrose now given the new name of Hazel is staying at a hotel, with the weather closing in and a child goes missing from the hotel. What now for Hazel and her past and also her real name? With the family now completely severing all connections with Laurel. Now all these years later Laurel is fighting to be released. She claims that she is a reformed character. She has a lawyer who also happens to be her Uncle.

Laurel and Rosie as children and Laurel and Hazel now nineteen years later and with a child gone missing the past could unfold in front them again. Hazel has spent these past years re-building her life while her sisters was locked up. The Flower Girls is a superbly written and gripping thriller. Alice Clark-Platts has created a tense and twisty thriller that will keep you on your toes until the very powerful ending. But with so many motives and also secrets especially with what really happened that day in the park. I love a thriller that makes the palms of your hands sweaty. I really love the way the author has created this storyline and keeps the reader guessing all the way through. How would the two sisters feel when they come face to face again after all these years? Highly Recommended.

352 Pages.

Thank you to Ros Ellis (Bloomsbury Publishing) for the review copy of The Flower Girls by Alice Clark-Platts

The Flower Girls was published by Raven Books and was published on 24th January 2018 and is available through Waterstones, Amazon and through your local independent bookshop.

Bram Stoker’s Dracula at The London Library

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Bram Stoker’s Dracula

The London Library

Thursday 7th February 2019

Dracula comes home to St. James Square

Bram Stoker was a member of The London Library between 1890 and 1897 and it was during this time that he spent time at the library researching for his novel ‘Dracula’ and recently Philip Spedding, Development Director at the library discovered a number of books that Bram Stoker used to research his novel and these include notes and annotations by Stoker himself. An incredible find and so Bram Stoker used the resources to create this masterpiece of writing.

To think that Bram Stoker was present in this very quiet St. James Square and created Dracula himself which is known throughout the world in books, cinema and small screen.

And so it was that Dracula has returned to its rightful home at The London Library in the form of a quite stunning and remarkable play thanks to Philip Marshall, Director of The London Library and Creation Theatre and what a setting. Thursday 7th February was also the birthday of another literary giant Charles Dickens and Dickens himself used The London Library to write and research for some of his most famous of novels. Arriving on this very evening walking in the footsteps of the greats, there is a very special feeling. No wonder they call this London’s best kept secret.

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This is the first time in The London Library’s 178 -year history that they have put on a play and it is thanks to the hard work of the staff that they set up the each of the performances and then return it to its library glory in time for the next morning.
The Production of Dracula is thanks to Creation Theatre and its Director Helen Tennison and Kate Kerrow who is responsible for its adaptation. There is a cast of two in the play: Sophie Greenham and Bart Lambert and what an outstanding performance by them both. The setting of the Reading Room at the library is perfect. It was as if Bram Stoker himself was present. There shelves floor to ceiling packed with books and its feel. This evenings performance in the presence of theatre critics and some celebrities.
And so the lights dim and the anticipation grew and the play began as we saw as Jonathan and Mina Harker who not long married appear. Jonathan who has recently returned from Transylvania and yet something about Jonathan is not right as Mina realises. But Mina is obsessed by her cousin Lucy who died very suddenly. But why did Lucy die and what was it that she has witnessed. Children have been disappearing but what has become of them. I just became engrossed in the performance of Bart Lambert whose enthusiastic grasp of multiple roles was just brilliant and for Sophie Greenham who also played multiple roles gave a superb balance.

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Bats wings against the window panes deep red eyes seem to appear through the blinds and is that Lucy above us on the ceiling and crack on thunder and flashes of lights and then darkness. This was gripping stuff. And so to the cemetery to Lucy’s grave. But is Lucy dead or is she un-dead? Spine-tingling and darn well creepy.

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If you are hoping for an appearance of Count Dracula himself then he is not here, this is the adaptation, purely focussing of Jonathan and Mina as well as Van Helsing, Lucy and Dr Seward. All played by Bart and Sophie. There are hints of sexual tension between Jonathan and Mina. I cannot think of a better setting than The London Library for Bram Stoker’s Dracula. The setting and the aroma that is all the old books. A heady mix. Dracula really has come home to St. James Square.

For someone like me who read the book when I was young and saw the films, this combined with viewing of Bram Stoker’s books on display made for a remarkable evening. My hope now is that there are future plays connected to writers from The London Library performed here. FIVE STARS.

Performances take place between 2nd February to 3rd March 2019. Tickets are still available. Performances start at 7.30pm. There is also a display of The London Library books that Bram Stoker used for his research which include notes and annotations as well as Bram Stoker’s official membership form when he joined the library. For more information and tickets: The London Library/Dracula

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The London Library.

The London Library was founded on the 3rd May 1841 by Thomas Carlyle and in 2019 celebrates its 178th anniversary. The list of those who have made The London Library their home is like the who’s who in literature. Charles Dickens, Charles Darwin, George Eliot, Arthur Conan Doyle, Bram Stoker, George Bernard Shaw, Virginia Woolf, Agatha Christie, Ian Fleming. With current writers such as Sebastian Faulks, Jessie Burton, Kazou Ishiguro, Robert Harris and Sarah Waters making The London Library their home. It has been the home for 10 Nobel Prize Winners and 4 Poets Laureate’s. In 1948 Winston Churchill became honorary Vice-President. Laurence Olivier and Edward Elgar also made the library their home.

On over 17 miles of shelving you will find over 1 million books. Some of the most important documents and books dating as far back as the 1500’s is found here.

My thanks to Laura Creyke from Mark Hutchinson Management, Philip Marshall, Director of The London Library and the staff for their kind invitation and warm hospitality on what was a five-star evening.

Links:

The London Library: The London Library

Creation Theatre: Creation Theatre

Mark Hutchinson Management: Mark Hutchinson Management

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Memories of a Lost Thesaurus by Katie Hall-May

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Memories of a Lost Thesaurus by Katie Hall-May

Memories of a Lost Thesaurus is the debut novel by Katie Hall-May and was released in May 2018. A little late with this review as I read Katie’s novel in January but commitments sadly meant I am only now getting to put this review out.

This was intriguing me as there are four characters in this novel, Cath, Alice, Patrick and a mysterious unnamed character just called: M. This is really a story of relationships. Everyone has problems during a relationship, that is a fact of life. Ghosts from the past can affect the present day if they are haunting you and this really is the case with Alice. And then there is Cath is dealing with a present day issue that can cause upset.

Do we let the past something from the past influence today and tomorrow? Complex lives make good storylines and Katie Hall-May has written a debut novel that is touching and sensitive. The fact the story only contains three main characters and a mysterious one makes you concentrate on each of them.

You know characters make the novel, and each one here is pulling you into the story that the author has created. I just loved the plot and each of the complex individuals. Sometimes there is tension and will make you wonder about each of them.

This is a story that is worth every page, beautifully constructed with plenty of twists along the way to keep you wondering until the end.

Follow Katie Hall-May on Twitter: @mypapercastles

Webisite: Katie Hall-May

 384 Pages.

Thank you to Katie Hall-May for the review copy of Memories of a Lost Thesaurus

Memories of a Lost Thesaurus was published by CreateSpace Independent Publishing and was published on 1st May 2018 and is available through Amazon.

Red Snow – Will Dean

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Red Snow – Will Dean

It does not seem too long ago that I was talking about Dark Pines and Tuva Moodyson the deaf reporter at the centre of the story. If you really loved Dark Pines as much as I and the many thousands of readers did, then I have news for you. Tuva Moodyson is back in the second book just released called Red Snow by Will Dean and it is even better.

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Tuva Moodyson is looking forward to starting her new role and also leaving behind the town of Gavrik. This is always what she has wanted. Moving to Malmo is a big step up. The Liquorice factory has been a place where many of the local inhabitants have worked. But now it is going to be at the centre of this story as someone has fallen from the roof the building but if that is not enough soon after another body is found but this is sinister as two liquorice coins are covering its eyes.

Now Tuva our investigative reporter has just a few weeks to find the who is behind the deaths. Could we get to know Tuva any more after book one. Well we do and Will Dean does not really hold back as we get to know Tuva a little more. But the storyline really centres on Gavrik and the liquorice factory that is as dark and foreboding as the local forest. You either love liquorice or you hate it and this really is how the locals see the factory. A means to an end. That’s it. But some of the characters who work here are just a little quirky to say the least.

The killer has been given the name of the ‘Ferryman’ and now Tuva must find the ‘Ferryman’ before the killer strikes again and the locals are a little nervous. Add to this there is a snowstorm which makes the town more eerie and dark.

Does Tuva uncover the killer or do they stop her from leaving Gavrik to start her new life? Now you have to read Red Snow to discover what really happens next.

400 Pages.

Thank you to Point Blank Books for the review copy of Red Snow by Will Dean

Red Snow by Will Dean was published by and was published on 10th January 2018 and is available through Waterstones, Amazon and through your local independent bookshop.

 

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